1. The description of the cases is largely based on Dan T. Carter's Scottsboro: A Tragedy of the American South.
  2. A defense witness testified that the women feared being arrested for hoboing. In his summation at a later trial, the defense attorney stated that the women feared being arrested for violating the Mann Act. See Carter, Scottsboro: A Tragedy of the American South, 230, 295.
  3. Alabama Governor George Wallace in 1976 pardoned Clarence Norris who was believed to be the only surviving Scottsboro defendant. See Carter, Scottsboro: A Tragedy of the American South, 425-427.
  4. Wright's case was declared a mistrial because the jury could not agree on whether to sentence him to death or to life imprisonment. See Carter, Scottsboro: A Tragedy of the American South, 48.
  5. Pfaff, "The Press and the Scottsboro Rape Cases," 73.
  6. Local lawyer Milo Moody and Chattanooga lawyer Stephen Roddy served as defense counselors. They were given very little time to advise their clients and prepare their case. Roddy also had a drinking problem and often came to the courtroom intoxicated. See Carter, Scottsboro: A Tragedy of the American South, 18-35.
  7. Olen Montgomery was blind in one eye and Willie Roberson had a severe case of venereal disease.
  8. Charlie Weems was released in November, 1943. Andrew Wright and Clarence Norris were released in January, 1944 but violated their parole and were sent back to prison. In 1946, Ozie Powell was released and Norris was re-released. Heywood Patterson escaped in 1948 and Alabama officials declined to re-capture him. Wright was released in 1950.


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February 2000